The Lawn Club Brings Bocce, Croquet And More To The Seaport

03/11/2021 in
The Lawn Club Brings Bocce, Croquet And More To The Seaport

If you prefer your socializing with a side of friendly competition, you’re in luck. Earlier this week, the Howard Hughes Corporation announced the transformation of the historic Fulton Market Building into The Lawn Club, a full-blown indoor/outdoor destination full of classic lawn games like cornhole, bocce, croquet and more.

In the summer months, the sprawling 20,000-square-foot space will expand outdoors, and when there’s more of a chill, you’ll be able to head inside to the Lawn Club’s individual synthetic grass turf courts, which will be available for rent.

There will also be plenty of seating available for lounging in between games (or while you watch everyone else in action), as well as kid-friendly community programming, interactive games, league nights and tailgate packages for watching televised sporting events.

The Lawn Club is slated to open in fall 2021 (you can keep tabs on their website for updates), and has all the makings of a well-loved community hub where lower Manhattanites can gather together post-vaccine.

photo: Howard Hughes Corporation

Tags: lawn club, seaport

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