How To Complete The 2020 Census — Even If You’re Living Remotely

04/06/2020 in
How To Complete The 2020 Census — Even If You’re Living Remotely

April 1 might mark the official Census Day for all U.S. inhabitants, but that does not mean you’ve missed your chance to make it known to the government that you — and, by extension, the greater community in which you live — deserve the appropriate number of seats in Congress and its fair share of federal funding.

For those who have been displaced due to the COVID-19 situation in New York City, there is a simple and fast way to submit your 2020 Census information, even if you haven’t personally received your letter or postcard.

First, head to my2020census.gov and select “Start Questionnaire.”


If you don’t have the official letter with your 12-digit census ID on hand, select the link below the “Login” button.

 

Select your home address’s general location.

 

Then, input your home address. The census will ask you to review your address one more time before submitting.

Fill in your full name and telephone number.

And  you’re in! The online form takes about five to 10 minutes to complete. Once it’s in, you can sit back and know you did an important and essential duty for your family, building, city and state.

One final note: Remember that federal law protects all your info on the census, so the ability to access your personal identity is limited to only a select few 2020 Census professionals.

Tags: 2020 census

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