Where to View the 2024 Solar Eclipse in Lower Manhattan

03/28/2024 in
Where to View the 2024 Solar Eclipse in Lower Manhattan

April 8 is an auspicious day. Also known as “Draw a Picture of a Bird Day” and “Empanada Day,” in 2024 it also happens to be the date of the next total solar eclipse visible in the United States. The total eclipse will be only visible along a sliver of the country from Texas to Maine, while all contiguous 48 states will experience a partial eclipse. In Lower Manhattan, the maximum eclipse will take place at 3:25 p.m., when almost 90 percent of the sun’s surface will be covered by the moon. 

What exactly does that mean? It’s pretty cool. The sky will darken, leading to dramatic shadows, but also prompting some nocturnal wildlife to believe it’s time to wake up, and vice versa. You don’t want to miss out on this astronomical marvel, because the next time an eclipse will fall within U.S. skies will be 2044. (But the next time you’ll be able to see a total solar eclipse in New York state will be 2079.)

Do NOT stare directly at the eclipse, and if you’re convinced a pair of regular ol’ Ray Bans will keep you safe, think again. According to NASA:

When watching the partial phases of the solar eclipse directly with your eyes, which happens before and after totality, you must look through safe solar viewing glasses (“eclipse glasses”) or a safe handheld solar viewer at all times. Eclipse glasses are NOT regular sunglasses; regular sunglasses, no matter how dark, are not safe for viewing the Sun. Safe solar viewers are thousands of times darker…

Hope you’re not afraid of the dark, because we want to help you have the best eclipse ever.

Classic Harbor Line is offering a 2.5-hour Solar Eclipse Viewing Cruise on Monday, April 8. To round out the experience, each passenger will receive a complimentary pair of eclipse glasses and a beverage. Other snacks and cocktails will be available for purchase.

The eclipse is just one of the sights to soak up in and around the New York Harbor — this tour sails down the Hudson River, passes Ellis Island, cruises by the Statue of Liberty and over to the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges. Cruise tickets range from $86 — $96 per adult. Purchase tickets here.

For a better vantage point, you can also view the eclipse from One World Observatory (117 West St). Admission to view the historic event from the observation deck of the highest point in the city includes a pair of solar eclipse viewing glasses, a beverage of your choice, a commemorative One World Observatory pint glass, a souvenir photo and a 10 percent discount at the observatory’s retail store. Tickets cost $94 for adults and can be purchased here.

If you prefer to fly solo, you can also view the eclipse from any of the public parks, plazas and greenspaces in the neighborhood — or your favorite neighborhood rooftop! Just be sure to have your safe solar viewing glasses on before you take a peek at the sun.

photo: iStock

Tags: eclipse

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